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Majorca

The largest of the beautiful Balearic Islands, Majorca has never lost its appeal amongst British holidaymakers. Lying in the Mediterranean off the south east coast of mainland Spain and little more than a two hour flight from most UK airports, Majorca offers virtually guaranteed sunshine throughout the summer months and for much of the year.

As Majorca has been one of the world’s favourite holiday destinations for decades, the island is an experienced host to the less mobile and so accessibility and facilities are generally very good. The island’s beautiful beaches and holiday atmosphere continue to attract tourists from right across the world. All the resorts offer an excellent range of local bars, cafes, restaurants and shops and there is plenty of nightlife. The south coast of the island tends to be livelier, but is also popular with families and older people alike.

The capital, Palma, is well worth a visit. It was founded by the Romans and includes the magnificent 14th century Gothic cathedral. Palma is also a shopper’s paradise and has a bustling city centre. However, if you prefer to get away from the crowds, then take a trip to the picturesque villages nestled in the shadows of the spectacular Serra de Tramuntana Mountains. Here you’ll be surrounded by olive and almond trees, as well as romantic windmills set amidst stunningly beautiful countryside. The island also offers many other interesting attractions such as ancient monasteries, excellent museums and idyllic fishing villages.

RESORT INFORMATION
Currency                                     Euro
Time Difference (from UK)            +1 hour
Flight Time (from UK)                   2 hours

Palma Airport Disabled Guide      http://www.palmaairport.info/airport/limited-mobility/
Voltage                                      220V, 50Hz AC
Shop Opening Times                  0900-1300 & 1630-1930 Mon-Sat (1000-2000 department stores)
Bank Opening Times                  0900-1400 Mon-Fri, 0900-1300 Sat (except during the summer)

Port D'Alcudia

General Description:
The resort of Port d'Alcudia is situated in the north of Majorca at the top of a long curving bay with an endless white sandy beach. It is 2 miles (3km) south of the historical old town of Alcudia, from which it takes its name. The sprawling, purpose-built resort, together with its neighbour Playa de Muro, stretches for 5 miles (8km) either side of the coast road and is particularly popular with British, German and Scandinavian families. It is a vibrant resort with many shops, bars, restaurants and a large pedestrianised marina with accessible facilities.  It has a fairly relaxed atmosphere; its spectacular beach is the major attraction, though it is also well placed for exploring the attractions around the north of the island. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Location:
On the NE coast, 34 miles NE of Palma and the airport. With 5 miles of white sandy beach all the way to Playa de Muro. The original Alcudia old town is situated around 2 miles inland from the port, and for many centuries it's imposing city walls protected the local community from invasion and frequent pirate attacks. The old town is certainly well worth a visit whilst on the island, with parts of the town dating back to around 1300.

Eating Out:
Eateries to suit most budgets, with the emphasis on casual dining and northern European cuisine. Fast food in most parts but many good restaurants, too. Waterfront eating in the port.

For the less mobile traveller:
Alcudia offers a flat resort, however the pavements are old and uneven and have not been regularly maintained, thus certain areas will be difficult to negotiate without assistance. Drop kerbs are also very limited in this area. Whilst the resort offers one of the best beaches on the island which has a promenade hugging the coastline, it too is uneven in parts and is constructed of contoured paving slabs which themselves can cause wheelchairs to have an uncomfortable ride.Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Cala Bona

General Description:

Cala Bona is not a purpose built holiday resort, but more of a small traditional fishing village that has grown and adapted to cater for the islands tourist market. The town today still has its original narrow streets, along with a small working harbour, around which you'll find a wide variety of open air cafes and bars.

The joy of Cala Bona is that its smallness promotes a feel of exclusivity, yet a 15 minute walk away is the large resort of Cala Millor where a wealth of shops, bars and restaurants are at your service. It’s been popular with British visitors for many decades, many returning year after year.

As little as 50 years ago much of this area of Majorca was still little more than a lonely dune covered stretch of coastline. But with almost 2km of fine sandy beach running from Cala Bona ('The Good Bay') to Cala Millor ('The Better Bay') and an every increasing demand for beds, the area has grown to become the major resort development on Mallorca's east coast.

Location:

The resort of Cala Bona and its nearest neighbour Cala Millor, are both part of the municipal district of Son Servera on Majorca's quieter east coast. 40 miles east from Palma Airport, 5 minutes car transfer from Cala Millor, or approximately 15 – 20 minute walk away to the South along the promenade.

Shopping:

From the Port and along the pedestrian seafront promenade in the direction of Sa Coma, you will find many small shops selling a variety of clothes, shoes and other goods such as toys, jewellery and typical souvenirs.

There are a selection of small supermarkets selling everything from freshly baked bread to meat, fish, fresh fruit and vegetables. The largest with the best variety of produce is the 'BIP' in the Calle de la Tramuntana near to the Harbour. You will find larger supermarkets such as Eroski if you travel the short distance to Son Servera or you could shop in Cala Millor where they also have Eroski, Mercadona, Lidl and Hiper Centro which is excellent for fresh fish.

On Friday mornings you can travel to the market in the nearby town of Son Servera by foot (45mins), or a short taxi trip for a few euros. At this market you can buy anything from sunglasses, bags to potted plants or a cooked chicken! The weekly market is enjoyed by many tourists and locals alike. If you are going there it's best to go early in the morning as the stalls tend to pack up around 1300.

Eating out:

At the Harbour and all the way along the seafront in the direction of Cala Millor you will find an excellent selection of restaurants with varying cuisine from traditional Spanish and Majorcan to Scandinavian, British, Italian and even Indian food. Indeed it can be very difficult to find a vacant table in peak season. To avoid disappointment it's best to reserve a table at your favourite restaurant in July, August and September!

For the Less Mobile Traveller:

Cala Bona is a wonderful flat and accessible resort with bars, restaurants and many other attractions. The main promenade is very flat and wide which leads all the way to Cala Millor a bigger and livelier resort, which can be reached within a 20 minute wheel. The beach at Cala Bona is not wheelchair accessible, but heading along the promenade to Cala Millor the sandy beach can be accessed from several points by wooden platforms leading to sunshades, also beach wheelchairs are available to enable access into the sea. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Cala Millor

General Description:
A modern purpose-built resort with little local character, dating from the 1950s and clinging to an impressive length of beach. The central part has a fine seafront promenade, lined with plenty of trees; a clean wide pedestrianised artery runs parallel. Most of the nightlife is found here – plenty of British and German pubs, karaoke bars and fast-food eateries. Son Moro (adjoining to the south) is somewhat smarter and quieter. Overall, though, it is a varied destination with something to please most holidaymakers. The entire bay is nearly 4 miles long and contained within largely unspoilt headlands. One of them, the Punta Amer, has been declared an area of special natural interest. It has a 17th-century watchtower from which the coastal area may be admired.

Location:
On the east coast, 12 miles east of the town of Manacor. 44 miles east of Palma; a little less from the airport.

Shopping:
"Artesanias" (handicraft shops) sell tourist bric-a-brac and there are some unremarkable boutiques, leather and jewellery shops. Market in Son Servera on Friday; Porto Colom on Tuesday and Saturday; Cala Ratjada on Saturday; Arta on Tuesday; Manacor on Monday. The latter also has a renowned pearl factory

Eating Out:
Nothing out of the ordinary: fish restaurants and international cuisine, including German, Chinese and Italian, plus the odd pie-and-chips pub and fast-food joint. Plentiful choice, but because the resort stretches right along the coast, it could take some time to locate the restaurant that takes your fancy.

For the less mobile traveller:
Calla Millor is a substantial resort with numerous bars, restaurants and many other attractions. The main promenade is very flat and wide and the sandy beach can be accessed from several points by wooden platforms leading to sunshades, also beach wheelchairs are available to enable access in to the sea. Some kerbs are high with limited drop downs, but generally the area is well maintained. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Palma City

General Description:

Palma is a stunner. It is stylish, sophisticated, intimate, yet bursting with life.  The honey-coloured stone city dates back to the 13th century and it is located on the southern shores of Mallorca, the island's capital city and looks out over the sparkling blue seas of the Mediterranean

Location:

The ferry port and cruise terminal is about 3.5 km from the old town and there is an urban beach just beyond the cathedral to the east, about a 10 minute walk and down by the sea front is a large marina, and a promenade for both cyclists and pedestrians. The airport is 9km away.

Shopping:

Palma’s shopping is the best on the Island and in the old quarter it is all packed within a square kilometre making it very easy to explore and walk around this area. Shops full of charm and boutique outlets await to be explored.

Eating out:

A multitude to different cuisine to choose, from seafood, Italian, British and of course Spanish and plenty of quirky cafes and lively refreshment stops can be explored and enjoyed.

For the Less Mobile Traveller:

Palma Mallorca is a wonderful flat and accessible city with plazas teaming with street entertainment and an abundance of vibrant and quirky cafes and bars. These do however have a lack of accessible WC’s, so a quick visit to a hotel or a fast food outlet is a good solution. The majority of streets have drop curbs, but a few can catch you out being high, but alternative routes can usually be found and on the whole the city is a pleasure to explore by wheelchair and is easy to get around. 

Playa De Muro

General Description:
Picturesque Playa de Muro, is one of Majorca's newly discovered destinations and will give you the opportunity to recharge your batteries! Holidays centre round the breathtaking white sandy beach and there's a wide range of water sports, with shallow, warm waters making it a great place for little ones. If you want to explore a little further a field, the S'Albufera Park on the outskirts of Playa de Muro is delightful, and birds from all over Europe flock here to nest every year.

Location:
On the NE coast, 34 miles NE of Palma and the airport. It is located between the resorts of Alcudia and C'am Picafort and is a relatively new resort development that lies at the centre of the magnificent Bay of Alcudia.

Shopping:
There’s a selection of shops, bars and restaurants and keen shoppers will enjoy wandering around the Saturday morning market, selling fresh produce and hand-crafted goods.

Eating Out:
Eateries to suit most budgets, with the emphasis on casual dining and northern European cuisine. Fast food in most parts but many good restaurants, too.

For the less mobile traveller:
Playa de Muro is situated on a main strip, which is split by a main road, which can be crossed safely in parts. One side being beach front hotels, with accessible beach points and the other side has an array of bars, restaurants and shops, which are mostly accessible. Please note kerbs are high and drop downs are limited, but side roads are relatively quiet therefore it is safe to wheel in the road. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Playa De Palma

General Description:

This resort is on the superb 6 km beach that runs from C’an Pastilla to Arenal. Wide and sandy it is backed by a modern promenade lined with palm trees and dotted with cafe bars and gets extremely busy in July and August. This is a lively resort and is packed with restaurants, bars and shops and if that’s not enough then Palma City is easily reached by bus or taxi.

Location:

The resort is only a 15-20 minute transfer from the airport and Playa de Palma refers to the 6km long stretch of Majorca’s central coast running from C’an Pastilla in the West around the bay of Palma, to the resort of El Arenal in the East.

Shopping:

Playa de Palma has an abundance of shops, large supermarkets and a nice selection of boutique type shops, along with of course the normal tourist shops.

Eating out:

A multitude to different cuisine to choose, from seafood, Italian, British and of course Spanish. Restaurants stretch along the coast line, offering variety with varying degrees of quality.

For the Less Mobile Traveller:

Playa de Palma is a wonderful flat and accessible resort with bars, restaurants and many other attractions. The main promenade is very flat and wide which leads to neighbouring resorts and also into Palma City itself, allowing flat easy wheeling for 6 - 8km. The beach is accessible and can be accessed from several points by wooden platforms leading to sunshades, also beach wheelchairs are available to enable access into the sea. 

Puerto De Pollensa

General Description:
Stretching for around 2 miles along the edge of a crescent-shaped bay, Puerto de Pollensa is an established resort with several hotels dating back to pre-war years and a port which has succeeded in keeping much of its character. The generally low-rise town also has the considerable benefit of a 1½-mile seafront promenade, much of it pedestrianised, attractively lined with palms and pines and offering good views across the bay to the rugged headlands. The little square set back from the marina has been paved, planted and equipped with old-fashioned lamps, and there are numerous pedestrianised lanes full of bars and restaurants, all of which contributes to the resort's relaxed and pleasant atmosphere.

Location:
Near the NE tip of the island near Cape Formentor (12 miles). 38 miles NE of Palma and the airport. 3¾ miles NE of Pollensa old town. 5¼ miles NW of old town of Alcudia.

Shopping:
Small selection of shops along the promenade, concentrated near the marina and extending to the streets behind. Good shops for leather, footwear and Lladro porcelain plus the usual seaside souvenirs and selection of basic food stores. Wednesday market on the square; Sunday market in old town of Pollensa.

Eating Out:
Good choice along the sea front and in the streets behind; besides varied local fare, there are Chinese, German and Italian options.

For the less mobile traveller:
The resort is split either side of a famous marina, one side is pedestrianised with an array of eating areas, which are mostly accessible. To the other side of the Marina the main street is parallel to a narrow sandy partially accessible beach. The town itself backing away from the accessible town square, has narrow streets, high kerbs and very few drop downs. In addition Puerto de Pollensa can offer a public swimming pool, which has a pool hoist. Please note that the route to the swimming pool has limited drop kerbs. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Sa Coma

General Description:

The principal industry is tourism, based around its golden sandy beach, and a variety of bars and restaurants and caters very well for the British market. The resort has a relaxed atmosphere in contrast to the lively resort of Magaluf on the west coast of the island. Sa Coma is a family oriented resort and evening entertainment takes place in hotels, rather than in bars or clubs. If you are looking for a wider selection of bars and restaurants, the "bright lights" of the livelier Cala Millor is only around 5 minutes away by taxi.

Sa Coma does have an exceptionally sandy beach with the sea having a shallow shelf of clear, blue water, which is perfectly suited for children. The beach has ‘Blue Flag’ status for cleanliness, water quality and safety. The beach is fronted with a wide traffic free promenade that runs the full length of the resort towards S'Illot to the south and the smaller sheltered beach of Cala Moreya. If you do venture into S'Illot, don't expect to find a mirror of Sa Coma, as most visitors find the contrast between the two resorts to be quite surprising. Unlike the modern purpose built Sa Coma, S'Illot was originally a traditional fishing village that has gradually adapted, and grown into a small holiday resort.

Location:

The purpose-built resort of Sa Coma, lies in the heart of Mallorca’s popular east coast, alongside its neighbour S'Illot both part of the municipal district of Sant Llorenç des Cardassar, almost midway between the resorts of Cala Millor and Porto Cristo. 40 miles east from Palma Airport, 5 minutes car transfer from Cala Millor.

Shopping:

On the main street you will find a chemist and a large Eroski supermarket, where you can buy everything from food shopping to electrical goods and even furniture. 

The resort and its neighbours have numerous shops and boutiques selling souvenirs and goods attractive to tourists. For a traditional market go to the nearby town of Son Server on Friday mornings.
 

Eating Out:

Sa Coma offers a varied selection of good quality restaurants, and just across the footbridge on the S’Illot seafront even more options are available. The ‘frito mallorquin’, lamb and vegetable stir-fry, is a speciality here.

For the Less Mobile Traveller:

The main promenade is very flat and wide and being a small resort access around it is good and the area is well maintained. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

Santa Ponsa

General Description:

A densely developed resort with few traces of the village that stood here before the massive expansion of tourism in the 1960s. Many of the hotels are located in the flat area behind the main beach, where there is a lengthy frontage of souvenir shops backed by long, rather characterless streets. The sloping ground and roads to the northwest and southwest are generally more attractive, some offering panoramic views of the bay, and there is a lively area of bars and fast-food outlets at the northern end of the beach. On the southern headland is a narrow inlet leading to the nautical club and moorings. Near here you can find a stone cross commemorating the landing in 1229 of King Jaime of Aragon, who drove the Moors from the island.

Location:
On the south west coast, in the Calvia region. 13 miles south west of Palma and 19 miles from the airport by fast road. 3 miles south west of Magalluf across a broad headland.

Shopping:
A large supermarket on the main road from Palma; a good supply of minimarkets distributed among the apartment complexes and in the main resort centre. Many banks and other essentials. Not exactly a shopper's paradise, but a good choice of small outlets and stalls, including clothes, beach wear and accessories, arts and crafts, souvenirs and jewellery shops; a few designer outlets. Serious shoppers should head for Palma.

Eating Out:
Plentiful restaurants and eateries serving local Majorcan, Spanish, Chinese, Italian and Indian; one can even have ostrich and kangaroo steaks. Variety ranges from fast-food outlets and kebab houses to A La Carte dining with sea views.

For the less mobile traveller:
When you enter into Santa Ponsa it is flat with good wide pavements, offering a selection of shops and restaurants to choose from. The beach is accessible with wooden platforms leading to sunshades. Beach wheelchairs are available to enable access into the sea. From this point the road inclines up the coast where amazing views can be enjoyed from the elevated position, but wheelchairs may find it hard negotiating the hill. Electric wheelchairs or a strong pusher would be recommended. Please note this resort closes in the winter months from November through to March.

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